What happens when I make copies for private use?

What happens when I make copies for private use?

Works that are published may be copied for private use. This means, for example, that private letters, non-published images and other unpublished materials that have not been made available to the public may not be copied for private use. You may copy copyrighted text for private use without the author's permission to a limited extent. The National Library limits such copies to 25% of the entire work.

Texts of limited length, such as articles, poems and short stories may be copied in their entirety. You may also copy images and maps for private use. It is permitted to make both electronic copies and hardcopies. However, you may not make the material available to the public by uploading what you have copied for private use to the Internet, for example to your own website. You need permission from the copyright holder for this.

Copies made for your own studies, for your own pleasure or for use by your immediate family and friends are considered to be for private use. It is not permitted to make copies for your whole extended family or for colleagues at work.

If you make copies for private use, you are responsible for how the copies are used. This applies regardless of whether you yourself make the copies or if the National Library makes the copies on your behalf.